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Words of Advice for Budding Photographers

Breaking into the world of professional photography is a challenge. Even with a keen eye for composition, you may need that extra something to get ahead of the competition. Chicago photographer Eric Craig shared his advice with Artmill for reaching pro-level status as an artist.

Portrait of Photographer Eric Craig

Eric Craig, recent featured photographer of the 16th annual 2017 Chicago Sculpture Exhibit and owner of Eric Craig Studios.

Go Online

The entire world is online, so if your portfolio isn’t then you’re missing out on the first opportunity to showcase your talent. Hosting your work on a portfolio site in addition to building a simple professional website are key elements to legitimizing yourself to a prospective client. In addition to that, spread your work on social media to brand the type of artist you are. Social Platforms like Instagram, Behance, and even Pinterest are ideal for promoting your photos and artwork.

Personality

It’s not just your work that is representative of your career, but also your personality and work ethic. Craig states that being on time and dependable is what earned him the respect of his clients. “You can be the best photographer and if you can’t work with clients, your chance at projects will go downhill.”

Craig’s recent installation at a local Chicago restaurant. Taken at Antelope Canyon in Page, AZ.

Network

A portfolio that shows range and a clean-cut website can feature your skills, but as mentioned previously, the impression you make is just as important as your creations. When growing your career take every step to grow your network in turn. Work will frequently come from referrals, so be mindful to go to events, chat up potential clients, and build those relationships.

Explore

Craig recommends exploring your environment to help figure out the direction to steer your career. “I like finding that shot I didn’t know was going to be there. Once a year, I’ll leave my phone at home and wander the city with my camera. Without the distractions, you go into a personal place.”


“For up and coming photographers, there are many ways to view your surroundings. Go out there and explore to find your niche. As you grow as a person, you find what you really like.”

Finding inspiration from your surroundings; additional shot from Antelope Canyon in Page, AZ.

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